Home Tech An impressive act of misrepresentation: Huawei’s official statement in response to Bloomberg’s accusation of involvement in a cyberattack in Australia

An impressive act of misrepresentation: Huawei’s official statement in response to Bloomberg’s accusation of involvement in a cyberattack in Australia

0
An impressive act of misrepresentation: Huawei’s official statement in response to Bloomberg’s accusation of involvement in a cyberattack in Australia

[ad_1]

Huawei Statement to Media on Bloomberg Post

The Bloomberg report is an impressive act of misrepresentation. The publication begins with a story that is not confirmed by any facts and was allegedly hidden for almost a decade, and ends with the same empty speculation. Given the claims of “evidence”, it is completely incomprehensible why this information has not been made public earlier.

Huawei has been in the Australian market for about 20 years, but this is the first time we hear about the threats described in the publication, despite the fact that such stories usually appear on the front pages of newspapers. Two Australian telecom operators, Optus and TPG, have already publicly stated that they have no information about the alleged incident. Moreover, the type of threat described in the report is complex and high-tech. However, the publication contains only comments from politicians and former officials. Again, it is unclear why Bloomberg was unable or unwilling to involve authoritative independent security experts in the discussion.

Here are the following facts.

First, Huawei hardware is malware-free. Even the UK’s National Cyber ​​Security Center (NCSC), one of the most respected cybersecurity agencies in the world, explicitly states that no defects have been found in Huawei’s equipment, indicating the illegal actions of the Chinese state. Huawei makes every effort to protect its products from intruders. Our software contains a robust set of mechanisms to ensure that software cannot be installed or downloaded when attempting to modify software updates.

Second, telecommunications networks are owned and operated by operators. Huawei is one of the many telecom equipment suppliers in the industry, and we do not have access to operators’ networks without their written permission. Operators also implement stringent security verification processes for software installation and switching. Like our peers in the industry, we must adhere to these processes strictly. The claim that “Huawei’s software update can freely install any code without notifying operators” is simply not true.

Third, Huawei has a complete set of procedures and mechanisms that govern the work of our engineers. This includes, but is not limited to, additional verification (to the extent permitted by law), software and hardware management, and mandatory compliance training. Our maintenance engineers cannot access or compile the source code.

Fourthly, we have always been and will be open for cooperation and scrutiny of our activities. Authorities, customers and other parties with an interest in the security ecosystem can systematically review our products and provide feedback on any design flaws, information system security, or code quality. The point is that the products of any other telecommunications equipment supplier are not subject to the same rigorous inspection and testing as those of Huawei. Our openness and transparency is essential to continually improving the reliability and security of our products, and we listen to feedback from the security community.



[ad_2]

Source link

gagadget.com

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here