Home SECURITY Big Brother will stop watching: Massachusetts against the sale of geodata

Big Brother will stop watching: Massachusetts against the sale of geodata

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Big Brother will stop watching: Massachusetts against the sale of geodata

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Big Brother will stop watching: Massachusetts against the sale of geodata

Will the new geo-privacy bill be passed?

In Massachusetts are discussing a bill that could be the first in the US to ban the sale of mobile phone location data. The “Protection of Location” project was submitted to the state legislature for a hearing last month. Its author is Democratic Senator Cindy Krim.

The purpose of the law is to restrict the practice of collecting and selling geolocation data, which is now available from mobile applications and other digital services. Such data does not contain a name or phone number, but can still be used to identify an individual. In most cases, the law will prohibit access to the location of devices, even for law enforcement, unless a warrant is obtained.

The project is backed by a coalition of Democrats who make up majorities in both houses of the Massachusetts legislature. It can be adopted within the framework of the current session, which will end next year.

However, the technology industry opposes innovation. For example, the idea was objected to by the trade association. During the public hearing, representatives said that Massachusetts should be guided by the example of Connecticut, which recently passed a more lenient privacy law. In another state, the state requires digital services and data brokers to obtain clear consumer consent to collect information, according to coalition lawyer Andrew Kingman. It also introduces some restrictions on its transfer and sale. “The definition of a sale is very broad,” Kingman said, adding that the industry always provides consumers with “an option to opt out of a sale.”

But defenders of the Location Protection Act, including the American Civil Liberties Union, insist on protecting digital data. Specialists are also concerned about digital harassment and threats to the national security of Americans.

Last year, the media reported that the US Department of Homeland Security bought materials on the location of millions of devices to track people near the state border. At the time, the Electronic Frontier Foundation’s privacy and civil liberties group argued that geolocations often made their way to police and local authorities. One data provider claimed to have access to 250 million devices in the US.

Also It revealed that the US police secretly uses the Fog Reveal program to process, filter and store information about the location of users. At the same time, law enforcement officers do not receive warrants for access to data and do not notify users about it.

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